Discover Games

RSS

stfueverything:

sayheyagentcarter:

TWO HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS CREATED A VIDEO GAME WHERE YOU SHOOT TAMPONS INSTEAD OF GUNS

image

image

image

image

image

image

SPREAD THIS LIKE WILD FIRE!!!!!!!!!!! 

SISTERS DOIN’ IT FOR THEMSELVES!!!!!!!!!!!!!

"we’ve normalized guns and violence through video games….yet we still find tampons and menstruation unspeakable"

^^^that right there.

Now, as then, the victims of a concerted trolling effort are selected not only by the probable combustibility of their reaction but also by the sense that they have it coming. In the previous decade, you had it coming because you were pompous or entitled or privileged or foolish. The spirit was mischievous, and its intent was to humiliate unclothed emperors. Today, to have it coming is to expose the nakedness of masculinity or whiteness or some other sacred cow of the self-serious; the trolls these days are the red-faced ones, the ones who cannot stand to have their worldview made fun of. “Butthurt” used to be a schoolyard taunt for our marks, not us.

- Confessions of a former internet troll on why it all went wrong. (via taylordobbs)

cartridgecomic:

I’m going to keep this short because this is a topic I never really wanted to talk about in Cartridge anyway and I have no intention of engaging in a debate over it, but I’d like to make this one observation. I’ve been seeing a lot of people taking the recent gaming culture fiasco and claiming it’s “not even about that anymore” in regards to the scandal that kicked things off. And while I would love to see a discussion concerning the intended topic, (because let’s face it, it’s been common knowledge for ages that the gaming journalism industry is more incestual than a Lannister family reuinion) I can’t get behind a movement that got started by trampling someone’s personal life. It’s a discussion we all need, but this is not the way to have it. The moment people are being threatened and attacked, that instantly becomes more important than any larger discussions of the ethics of an industry. Anyway, that’s just my two cents. Take it or leave it. I’m aware this statement is going to invite a lot of hatred, but I’m honestly not interested. I’ve spent my time doing the research. I’ve wasted far more time on this whole clusterfuck than I ever wanted. I’m done and moving on.

cartridgecomic:

I’m going to keep this short because this is a topic I never really wanted to talk about in Cartridge anyway and I have no intention of engaging in a debate over it, but I’d like to make this one observation. I’ve been seeing a lot of people taking the recent gaming culture fiasco and claiming it’s “not even about that anymore” in regards to the scandal that kicked things off. And while I would love to see a discussion concerning the intended topic, (because let’s face it, it’s been common knowledge for ages that the gaming journalism industry is more incestual than a Lannister family reuinion) I can’t get behind a movement that got started by trampling someone’s personal life. It’s a discussion we all need, but this is not the way to have it. The moment people are being threatened and attacked, that instantly becomes more important than any larger discussions of the ethics of an industry.

Anyway, that’s just my two cents. Take it or leave it. I’m aware this statement is going to invite a lot of hatred, but I’m honestly not interested. I’ve spent my time doing the research. I’ve wasted far more time on this whole clusterfuck than I ever wanted. I’m done and moving on.

Freeware Review - Nitronic Rush (PC)

image

Nitronic Rush is just one of those games you always see around. If, like me, you have a passion for free games and games with striking visuals, you’ve no doubt seen this one pop up over the years. As we’ve established, I’m not a fan of racing games, but the visuals finally won me over enough to give it a shot, and guess what: it’s a blast. Even the standard “races” (there are no other cars around, so you’re just trying to beat your own time) are a lot of fun, thanks to the really smooth, arcadey handling of the cars (and yes, the gorgeous art). But you quickly realize that the game is much more about stunts, spectacle, and screwing around - and that’s where the magic happens.

Read More

hardcoregamermagazine:

Hard-to-Find Dragon Quest V DS Gets Reprint
Sold as “pre-owned,” the game is likely new and is priced at a reasonable $24.99 (or $22.49 for PowerUp Rewards members). It is worth noting that these reprints can sometimes come without cases and manuals, however, so competitions should tread carefully. For those who want to purely experience the game, it’s a great deal no matter how it arrives — carts sell for over $35 alone.
Give it a look!
http://www.hardcoregamer.com/2014/09/23/hard-to-find-dragon-quest-v-ds-gets-reprint/107040/

Good news! This game’s next up in my complete, in-order playthrough of this series, and it’s hard to find at a reasonable price. Hopefully this will help.

hardcoregamermagazine:

Hard-to-Find Dragon Quest V DS Gets Reprint

Sold as “pre-owned,” the game is likely new and is priced at a reasonable $24.99 (or $22.49 for PowerUp Rewards members). It is worth noting that these reprints can sometimes come without cases and manuals, however, so competitions should tread carefully. For those who want to purely experience the game, it’s a great deal no matter how it arrives — carts sell for over $35 alone.

Give it a look!

http://www.hardcoregamer.com/2014/09/23/hard-to-find-dragon-quest-v-ds-gets-reprint/107040/

Good news! This game’s next up in my complete, in-order playthrough of this series, and it’s hard to find at a reasonable price. Hopefully this will help.

garayur:

I just discovered this on Bandcamp. It is the soundtrack to one of my favorite indie games. 

Just letting you know there are a ton of benefits to pre-ordering games. You get extra add on content, posters, early betas or content for other games, and plenty more goodies. Never tell people not to pre-order games because then they're missing out

Well, first of all, I’d question the value of some of that stuff. “Extra add on content” is most often content that should already be in the game, and probably would be in the game, if pre-orders weren’t a thing (or it might be held back as DLC; ca-ching!). Posters and “content for other games” is mostly just marketing the companies get you to do for them. I see no reason to pay companies extra just to give us what they should already be giving us, and certainly no reason to pay them for the privilege of doing their work for them.

If you like that kind of stuff, fine. Go nuts. But pre-ordering is still a net negative for consumers. It still hurts us, and continues to shift the balance of power away from where it belongs - the consumers. And since I am a conscientious consumer (one who doesn’t have a bunch of extra income to flush away), that means it hurts me. So I’ll damn well speak up about it if I want to, thanks.

caramelzappa:

Ea promising the new battlefield “will work” at launch is a hilarious admission of past failures and sets an incredibly low bar. It also means nothing, since every $60 game is supposed to work on day one, and it pretty consistently doesn’t happen.

Remember kids, don’t preorder. These companies promises mean nothing and you won’t know the quality of a game until its out.

Yeah, it’s not a great sign when the best selling point your marketing department can come up with is “It’s technically a viable piece of software!”

Also, the part I bolded up there is something I’ve been saying for years, and something I will continue to scream from the mountaintops until my goddamned lungs bleed out. Unless there’s going to be some kind of massive shortage (which you have no way of knowing ahead of time), there’s literally zero benefit to pre-ordering games. All you’re doing is wasting your money on something you haven’t even seen, with no guarantee that it will be remotely good, functional, or will even come out at all. And in the process, you’re sending a message for all of us to the big game companies that we’re credulous, uncritical saps who will throw our money away based on nothing but empty promises. You’re telling them that we care so little about our purchases that not only do we not demand quality games, we don’t even require that a game exist for us to salivate over it and fire our money at the companies with a circus cannon. Please. Stop. Exercise some patience and restraint. For all of our sakes.

has there ever been a first-person open-world game?

Anonymous

Yeah, I think several games fit that category. The Far Cry series (especially FC2), the Elder Scrolls series (3-5), the S.T.A.L.K.E.R. series. Hell, you could even put Proteus in that category if you wanted (it’s not huge, but it’s totally open). Those are the ones that spring to mind for me, anyway.

I have been wanting to play this game for years, but never had the right console. It’s finally arrived on Steam, and I’m so stoked! Now, to wait for a ludicrous sale so I can pick it up (hey, some things never change).

I have been wanting to play this game for years, but never had the right console. It’s finally arrived on Steam, and I’m so stoked! Now, to wait for a ludicrous sale so I can pick it up (hey, some things never change).

geekstuffandranting:

Don’t get me wrong, gaming journalism has its fair share of problems, but here’s what those problems aren’t:

  • a massive conspiracy between indie developers and gaming websites against people to play video games
  • people talking about social issues in games

pre-optranscentaur:

I’d argue that there are two main ideas on what the whole GamerGate thing is trying to argue against: 1, that the gaming journalism industry is is corrupt in that it tends to lack a lot of the core tenants of journalistic ethics and integrity concerning the relationship between reporter and reported, and 2, that the gaming journalism industry is corrupt in that it tends collude to push a single narrative on social issues where possible and exclude those who don’t join in. 

I honestly don’t tend to care much about the second point. While I tend not to agree with some of the ideological bits that tend to seep out in places (Gone Home getting game of the year awards because it dealt with a gay relationship with the chops of a YA fic, for example), I can’t see anything wrong with wanting to include a broader spectrum of people into games, both as players and characters. At this point, that just gives creators a bigger toolbox with which to try to make something novel.

What does concern me (and a great many other people) is the first bit. That this is an industry where the people who funded Fez can be among its judges for the sort of awards that would undoubtedly increase its sales is a problem. That a company like EA can see a massive breach in user data and sweep it under the rug, potentially because they’re close with the journalists that would otherwise report on such things, is a problem. That the GameJournoPros group so blatantly colludes in the attempt orchestrate a single message across so many websites is a problem. And that all of this is being so casually written off as the gripes of misogynists/trolls/whatever who don’t want to see diversity grow in the industry is a problem. 

Now, I can agree that honest journalism on something so subjective is naturally divisive, and I’m perfectly okay with that. Even when it comes to op-ed stuff, we should all expect that the author is just speaking from their own personal context. We, as an audience, can then take it with a grain of salt and look elsewhere if we don’t like what they’re saying.

Except, of course, in the cases where you can’t. Like, say, when about a dozen op-ed pieces come out on nearly as many different major sites all about the same “gamers are dead” topic, all within the span of 24 hours. Because then this system based on honest coverage of subjective issues seems a lot less honest.

This is far and away the most reasonable pro-GamerGate discussion I’ve seen so far, so I want to respond in kind. What follows is a long and detailed look at the assertions above. I’m putting it under a cut for those of you who don’t want this novel on your dash. You’re welcome.

Read More

(Source: discovergames)

homosexual-android:

image

doot doot

What #GamerGate is really about

plus10tofireresist:

I think this is the best description I’ve seen concerning what Gamer Gate truly is, its tribal mindset, and how it does and doesn’t relate to misogyny. 

https://storify.com/a_man_in_black/gamergate-sexism-and-tribalism

This is a good read. It acknowledges that #GamerGate is not all about misogyny (something anti-GG folks could stand to do more often), and then posits a pretty reasonable alternative for the main driving forces: fear and tribalism. Definitely interesting and worth the (short) time it takes to read.

gamingonabudget:

Save  85% off The Binding of Isaac ($0.74) on Steam

I can’t imagine there are very many of you who haven’t either played this game or decided you don’t want to (here’s my review, if you’re interested), but if there are any of you left, $0.74 is an obscenely good deal. Get on that.

gamingonabudget:

Save  85% off The Binding of Isaac ($0.74) on Steam

I can’t imagine there are very many of you who haven’t either played this game or decided you don’t want to (here’s my review, if you’re interested), but if there are any of you left, $0.74 is an obscenely good deal. Get on that.