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dorkly:

Bluegrass Version of the Dark World Theme Soothes a Weary Hylian [VIDEO]
A Link to the Appalachians.
Hey! Look! Listen!

dorkly:

Bluegrass Version of the Dark World Theme Soothes a Weary Hylian [VIDEO]

A Link to the Appalachians.

Hey! Look! Listen!

pyranova:

Dr. Nerdlove Nerds and Male Privilege Part 2

This is one of the most common deflections when the issue of how women are portrayed comes up. It’s known as a false equivalence – the idea that two things presented together as equal when in fact they aren’t. In this case, the idea that just because women have exaggerated physiques doesn’t mean they’re sexist because the men are just as exaggerated too. Of course, this doesn’t work for many reasons. To start with, it assumes – falsely – that the things that women find sexy are the same things that guys find sexy; that is, the exaggerated secondary sex characteristics. But we’ll get to that in a second.

The other issue is the reason for the exaggeration. Comics and games are fantasy true, but the fantasy aspect differs when it comes to male and female characters. Male characters are a power fantasy; the large muscles and massive torsos are visual signs that this character is an unstoppable powerhouse. Kratos doesn’t look the way he does because Sony Computer Entertainment did focus-market studies and found that women reacted best to that design; he looks the way he does because he represents the powerful alpha-male that gamers want to be.

The women, on the other hand, are sexual fantasies. These are the rewards for the player – the character’s love-interest, the motivation to complete the game. They’re designed as eye-candy; they’re intended as something to be consumed, not something to escape into. Women like to fantasize about being desirable yes, but they also like to be powerful, and their definition of what they would consider to be sexy and powerful doesn’t mean battle-bikinis and thongs of power.

But hey, I’m a guy. It’s easy for me to sit here and proclaim what women find sexy, but I could be talking out of my ass. So why not take it to the source? I put out a completely unscientific poll on Facebook and Twitter about characters that women find sexy – video games, comics, anime, whatever. And the results? Well, let’s compare.

Up top we have the exaggerated figures that are supposedly sexy.

And here are the characters my female readers find sexy:

image

Notice a trend here? These are not the massive beefcakes alpha-males that are supposedly as equally objectified as Kasumi, Ayane or Ivy. These men have longer torsos with much leaner builds; they’re built like swimmers rather than weight-lifters. They’re not men who scream “unstoppable physical power”. They’re lithe and dextrous, not barrel-chested juggernauts with treestumps for limbs.

And the other critical factor: it’s not just their builds that make them sexy. Gambit, for example is attractive because of his personality and his situation; he’s tortured because he can’t physically touch the woman he loves. Nightcrawler is the laughing swashbuckler, full of wit and flirty charm. Jareth is dark and mysterious and just a little dangerous and oozes sexuality.

Yes, the men are exaggerated as much as the women. But it’s the intent and the message that make all of the difference.

killscreen:

"Consider that turn of phrase for a second. Post-human means that man is the apocalypse. And besides, Kevin Maxon says it’s time for new language. “I stopped using the word post-apocalyptic because it gave the wrong message,” he said. “There are literally no humans to interact with in Eidolon.”

Eidolon imagines a life long after the end of man

relaxmammal:

i beat sword and sworcery ep earlier today after putting it off for an eon and now i can definitely add it to the ranks of “games that made me cry a shameful amount”

relaxmammal:

i beat sword and sworcery ep earlier today after putting it off for an eon and now i can definitely add it to the ranks of “games that made me cry a shameful amount”

  • gamer dweebs: if you don't like the game, why don't you just make your own version? That way I can ignore it, downvote it, talk shit about it, roll my eyes when people talk about it, refuse to play it, badmouth the person who made it, steal it, play five minutes of it, write a passive aggressive jemble review about it, then pretend it was some infallibly neutral and objective invisible hand of the market that caused it to fail, then use it as an example of what happens when people don't do what I want.

feministgaming:

I’ve never quite understood why people have such a reaction to criticism of things they like

like, it isn’t like they care whether or not it is feminist (for example), because otherwise they’d be more upset with it’s failings than the callout

I don’t get what causes the grief. “Oh no, the thing I like isn’t flawless? I must attack the messenger?”

gameological:


"There’s certainly nothing wrong with the Fruit Ninjas or Angry Birds of the world, but it’s 2014. Games have proven themselves capable of grappling with controversial, adult themes in interesting new ways. Sure, not every game that deals with serious issues works well, but they should at least have the opportunity to succeed or fail.”

—For Our Consideration: Apple’s hypocritical App Store policies infantilize games
Illustration by Nick Wanserski

gameological:

"There’s certainly nothing wrong with the Fruit Ninjas or Angry Birds of the world, but it’s 2014. Games have proven themselves capable of grappling with controversial, adult themes in interesting new ways. Sure, not every game that deals with serious issues works well, but they should at least have the opportunity to succeed or fail.”

For Our Consideration: Apple’s hypocritical App Store policies infantilize games

Illustration by Nick Wanserski

Self-Interviewing Devs: Proteus And “Walking Simulators”

yhancik:

Game devs Ed Key (Proteus) & Ricky Haggett (Hohokum) discuss the term “Walking Simulators”, followed by some more interesting discussion in the comments. Have a read.

[Harassment has] been a constant part of my experience ever since I began working at GameSpot. And the reality is that before I took the job, I knew a certain percentage of young, straight men would vocally object to the presence of a transgender woman on the staff of a gaming site.

They feel entitled not only to games, but to the communities that had built up around games. For these men, the presence of women on these sites was acceptable only if they felt that the presence of those women was intended to appeal to them.

- Caroyln Petit, as quoted in this excellent article

hannakdraws:

twitter doodle-comic inspired by the new Zelda trailer

How hard should achievements be?

guilelessmonk:

I haven’t talked about achievements in a long time and that is a shame because they are actually super interesting. They can do many things such as be used as a tool for teaching players advanced mechanics, for example TF2 loves to do this with achievements that teach you special tricks for each class.

image

But today I’d like to talk a bit about aspiratory achievements, achievements that want to push you beyond the scope of simply completing the game. The great thing about these kinds of achievements is that they give players something to do with the game after the beating it, they give the player a chance to push their skills beyond what the game would normally expect of them. This gives people more time, doing new things, with games they like.

This can great in intermediate step towards players speed running even. When asked what got them into speed running many simply say that there was this game they thought they were good at wanted to try and push themselves. By having hard aspirational achievements it gives players something to shoot for in between being able to beat a game and being able to speed run a game.

This does lead to the question though of how hard aspirational achievements should be. Very hard aspirational achievements can give people more to shoot for, more to aspire to, but they can also be incredibly daunting.

Read More

My feelings on achievements have evolved over the years. At first I just didn’t “get it,” and couldn’t understand why a little meaningless blip at the bottom of the screen was so important to people. Now, I think I understand the basic joy in that, even if I rarely chase achievements.

More importantly, as OP noted, I think achievements can be used by developers to subtly (and optionally) guide players towards doing desirable things, like mastering certain mechanics or poking around the world a little more. I know for me, when I see an achievement that looks easily doable, so long as I use more dodge attacks or go off the beaten path a few times, I’ll gladly do it.

However, the subject of the OP was the upper-tier aspirational achievements, which are definitely a different animal. While those affect completionists who can’t help themselves, I usually see them more as a compact between the developers and their most rabid, ardent fans. It’s like the developer saying, “If you love our game so much that you are replaying it multiple times and mastering it, we want to give you something special, to both reward your loyalty and to give you a reason to keep striving and coming back for more.”

That’s a rosier view than I would normally take, and maybe even a bit naive, but that’s the way I see it. And in that case, I suppose the achievements should be as hard as the fans want it, in order to give them the challenge they want. It’s not a very specific answer, but it’s definitely a case-by-case kinda thing. 

has there ever been a game that kinda gave you motion sickness? like one with flashy graphics that kinda affected you?

Anonymous

Only one so far. It’s a free game that lets you experience the effects of relativity, and it’s called A Slower Speed of Light. You can probably see why if you take a look at this trailer.

Will you be playing the destiny beta at all?

Nope. Even if I had the consoles it runs on (which I don’t), it doesn’t really look like my thing.

caramelzappa:

Step 1: insist that every part of your game is always online, even the single player portions that have no reason to be online.

Step 2: don’t pay for enough servers for your millions of fans to log onto

Step 3: apologize for the inconvenience.

Congrats! You’re a shitbag game company!

Bonus points if you’ve already done this before.

Imagine if forty years into the existence of the motion picture, the overwhelmingly prominent genre was the action film. You might have a quiet drama here and satirical comedy there, but otherwise it’s nothing but Bay and Bruckheimer as far as the eye can see. We’d have a lot less cinephiles than we do now, that’s for sure.

- David Wurzel, comment on article
Something new under the Sunset at Tale of Tales | Joystiq (via notgames)