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[…] And now, in 2014, women have been forced into hiding – for voicing an opinion about videogames. That’s a sentence that should only ever appear in the opening chapter of an implausible dystopian sci-fi novel, moments before you toss it in the bin.

There seems to be a small yet vocal core of maniacs bafflingly resistant to the notion that women should have any say in the games industry at all. Even recent statistics indicating that female players now outnumber men can’t sway them, thanks to a lazy assumption that most of those women are playing Candy Crush or other, equally non-taxing “casual games” apparently un worthy of being called “games” at all. I don’t think that’s true, and even if it were, I wouldn’t blame women for voluntarily choosing to play something soothing and non-threatening in their free time, since they spend so much of the rest of their time being forced to play a terrifying survival horror MMORPG colloquially known as “The Internet”. Women are the hardest hardcore gamers there are, by miles.

- Charlie Brooker: “Gamergate: the internet is the toughest game in town – if you’re playing as a woman” (via albionblues)

guilelessmonk answered: I could never bear to be on the dark side. Whenever I tried I always felt bad and ended up switching sides.

Yeah, I can never choose the “evil” option in games. The only times I’ve ever done it were on accident, and I felt like crap. Unless of course we’re talking about Spec Ops, where there are only evil options.

Review - Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic (Xbox, 2003)

image

Serious combat issues, but still one of the best adventures in the galaxy

There’s pretty wide consensus that Knights of the Old Republic is the best videogame to use the Star Wars license. Then again (and I say this as someone with a documented affinity for these games), that’s not a particularly high bar to meet. But this game doesn’t need to rely on poor company to look good by comparison - it’s a damn good game in its own right. It’s a sprawling, exciting story with interesting, relatable characters and some solid roleplaying action to hold it all together. The combat is mostly unsatisfying and there are some very obtuse D&D-style mechanics that bog things down, but these issues can’t detract from what is otherwise a vast and memorable adventure.

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Finally going to post a review today of a game I finished a few months ago, but started over two years ago. ‘S been a long time comin’.

pushtosmart:

Push to Smart’s Halloween Recommendations: Silent Hill 2.

whats the most you ever spent on games in one takeout?

Anonymous

I spend incredibly little money on games (or on anything else, for that matter). When games that were originally $60 drop to $30, and then go on a 75% off sale, I still can’t pull the trigger on that, even though pretty much everyone would agree it’s a great deal. I am just too damned broke to pay anything but absolutely ridiculous rock-bottom prices for games.

So, to answer your question, I think $30 is the most I ever spent in one go, $25 of which was a Steam gift card. This was during the last Winter Sale, which means I got like five games for that price, including Saints Row 2 and Skyrim.

alexander-of-caledon:

QUIJA READING GAMES: INVOCATION is a new zine by… me! PDF-format zine of 20pgs, with delicious, topical writing on queerness + games that I’ve not published anywhere else, all for a suggested price of £2 [$3.23 approx] (or more, if yr generous and like to see me Not Dying).
Buy it over yonder: https://gumroad.com/l/quija-invocation
Free preview: https://gumroad.com/l/quija-invocation-free
Features: What the hell a GamerGate is and why it’s kind of awful; respecting gaymers and girl gamers when they share their selfies with folk who aren’t you; how Wee Jas from D&D could be the next big queer goddess; the politics of Grand Theft Auto V’s polyamorous sex scene (that never happened); ideas for making games where YOU!! are the hero; and more! Buy it and you’ll be helping me to stay alive. x

alexander-of-caledon:

QUIJA READING GAMES: INVOCATION is a new zine by… me! PDF-format zine of 20pgs, with delicious, topical writing on queerness + games that I’ve not published anywhere else, all for a suggested price of £2 [$3.23 approx] (or more, if yr generous and like to see me Not Dying).

Buy it over yonder: https://gumroad.com/l/quija-invocation

Free preview: https://gumroad.com/l/quija-invocation-free

Features: What the hell a GamerGate is and why it’s kind of awful; respecting gaymers and girl gamers when they share their selfies with folk who aren’t you; how Wee Jas from D&D could be the next big queer goddess; the politics of Grand Theft Auto V’s polyamorous sex scene (that never happened); ideas for making games where YOU!! are the hero; and more! Buy it and you’ll be helping me to stay alive. x

Prompt #6: Due 10/29 6pm

promptservice:

As promised, for Prompt #6 there are three choices you can pick from. As always, stories should be 500-1000 words, and they are due by 6pm next Wednesday, 10/29.

Option 1: “There’s a storm coming…”

Option 2: “A funny thing happened on the way to the break room.”

Option 3: Select a haiku (or create your own) and write a story inspired by that. (Please include the haiku with the submission - this will not count towards your total word count.)

I saw a gamergater on twitter today genuinely calling a low review for a game he liked “corruption”. It was… I’m not even sure. I felt a mixture of disbelief and embarrassment for him. And he is the second or third one I have seen calling review scores he didn’t like “corruption” in journalism.

So really, when they say they are against “corruption”, what they really mean is they are against anyone who doesn’t hold their opinions.

- magnesium @ wehuntedthemammoth (via sunhawk)

Jim Sterling hits the nail on the head with this video about Bayonetta 2, or rather the reactions to the game and to criticism of it. The bottom line: it’s okay to think the game and the character are empower and awesome, and it’s okay to think they are gross and sexist. There are good points to be made on either point (and plenty of ground in between), and that’s a healthy discussion to have. What’s not healthy is getting angry about someone else’s opinion and waging a campaign to shut down all critical thought and dialogue.

I was wondering, any tips for reviewing games? I want to begin to do them myself.

(Note: this ask was from a loooong time ago, and I either didn’t see it or forgot all about it. Whoops.)

So, I’ve gotten variations on this question a few times, and I never get tired of answering it, because the art of reviewing is something I think (and care) a lot about. Remember that, especially long ago, criticism of literature was held in high regard as literature itself. Now, I’m not suggesting that what I (and most reviewers) do is any kind of high art, but I do think it’s interesting to talk about. After a couple of paragraphs, you may disagree.

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tiryn:

Videogame Survey

Hello! If you have a moment, please take my survey on how people feel about videogames. I need it for a class and I’d appreciate it if you could take or simply share this. Thank you!

jrbutler:

guilelessmonk:

I’m so sick of games that would prefer to be movies.

I’m so sick of people who can’t appreciate a good narrative if it’s presented in any other way than by a book.

You’ve misunderstood. You clearly took the OP to mean “I don’t want narrative in games,” which is incorrect. What it actually means (or at least what I meant by reblogging it), is something more like this: it’s a shame when certain game designers are so enamored by film that they ignore the inherent strengths of the videogame medium. 

I love good narrative, whether that’s in books, television, or videogames. But each medium has strengths and weaknesses, and it’s important to recognize that, and play to your strengths. A movie consisting largely of text scrolls doesn’t make good use of its strengths. Neither does a videogame consisting largely of long cutscenes. As they say, the motto of good filmmaking is “show, don’t tell” - and the corresponding motto for videogames should be “do, don’t show.”

guilelessmonk:

I’m so sick of games that would prefer to be movies.

After I played one of the Total War games, I actually looked up some of the history behind it. That ever happen to you?

Anonymous

A few times, yeah. Assassin’s Creed is one example, and The Cat and the Coup is another, and there’s probably more.