Discover Games

RSS

gamingonabudget:

GamersGate is having a huge spring sale.  New deals every day with flash deals every few hours.

spacetreasure:

No matter the tools you use, if you are creative and you are making something with passion, you have my admiration.

People will tell you — directly or indirectly — that you’re not a real programmer, not a real artist, not a real writer, not a real…

Don’t create to prove yourself to anybody. Create to communicate, to release, to give meaning, to love.

Just create. And to me, you’re a real anything.

What's your thoughts on violent games? You think it's better that they're used as stress relievers or do they make people aggressive?

Anonymous

strong-right-cross:

discovergames:

First, I think that’s a false framing of the issue. Those are not the only two possible responses to violent games. Also “violent games” is becoming this strange pseudo-category that is marched out to defend itself every couple of months, but nobody ever really defines it in a way that is useful. It’s like they want to keep it as this mysterious chimera into which all of our fear and hatred can be safely poured.

That said, I think games in general can be well used as stress relievers. Shooters can be a good choice for that because they can be fast and visceral, but violence is not a necessary element to a good stress-relieving game. Proteus is a legendarily relaxing game, and not a hint of violence can be found there.

And no, violent games do not make people aggressive. That’s something the Fox News Moral Crusaders have been trying to imply for years, but there’s simply nothing to back it up. In study after study, it’s coming out that while sometimes playing games can cause indicia of aggression in players it is the competition, not the violence, which causes it. That is, people playing Mario Kart against others are much more likely to get “aggressive” than people playing Manhunt on their own, which means depictions of violence have little or nothing to do with it.

Interesting to note, regarding who gets upset about violence in video games, is that the first big crusader against them was Tipper Gore, Al Gore’s wife. She started the revolt, first going after Mortal Kombat. So it’s not a Fox News thing, it’s a liberal thing.

I can’t find any specific information as to Tipper Gore protesting Mortal Kombat, though it wouldn’t be surprising since she was a co-founder of the PMRC, which lobbied against “profanity” in music. Of course, it’s also important to note that other founders and supporters like Secretary of State James Baker and the wife of Strom Thurmond, were conservatives. Just having one prominent liberal at the head of something doesn’t make it “a liberal thing.” Censoring artistic expression based on religious morals and old-world social mores is by definition conservative, an idea bolstered by the all the prominent liberal musicians who came out against the PMRC crusade.

But, even if the fight against violent videogames were “a liberal thing” in the 1990s (which, again, is not true), there’s no doubt the crusade is a conservative one today. Fox News, religious groups, parents groups, conservative politicians. It’s these organizations - and not, say, labor unions, college professors, artists or other typically liberal groups - who are clogging up the airwaves with scare tactics and hit pieces designed to frighten parents and lawmakers into censoring or banning certain games.

I don’t think it’s necessary or helpful to frame this issue as a “left vs. right” or “liberal vs. conservative” conflict (since xenophobes and technophobes can exist all over the political spectrum), but if you’re going to do that, you’ve got to do so with a bit of honesty and integrity. Suggesting that a Senator’s wife’s comments over 20 years ago automatically make this “a liberal thing” today doesn’t quite pass the smell test. There’s no doubt that prominent Democrats have been involved in efforts against games (disgraced California State Senator Leland Yee, for example), but by and large this is still a very conservative campaign, fought by conservative people through conservative media.

The Humble Weekly Sale Presented by TSG: A bundle built for speed

humblebundle:


image

A group of expeditious individuals, TSG, will be conducting their 32nd gaming marathon for charity this week and we are elated. So much so that a bundle has been created in their honor, a rather massive bundle at that.

Twelve games plus a few surprises are in store so contain yourself…

A lot of really great games here.

So how are you liking Guacamelee? Will you be doing a review on it as well?

I am loving it. I am literally having to balance the strong desire to play it vs. the sad realization that if I keep playing, it’ll be over very soon.

Anyway, yes, I will absolutely review it. But I am currently (and perpetually) behind on my reviews, so it’ll probably be a month or two before I get to it. Next in the queue to review (hopefully today?) is Batman: Arkham Asylum. Spoiler alert: it’s really good.

What's your thoughts on violent games? You think it's better that they're used as stress relievers or do they make people aggressive?

Anonymous

First, I think that’s a false framing of the issue. Those are not the only two possible responses to violent games. Also “violent games” is becoming this strange pseudo-category that is marched out to defend itself every couple of months, but nobody ever really defines it in a way that is useful. It’s like they want to keep it as this mysterious chimera into which all of our fear and hatred can be safely poured.

That said, I think games in general can be well used as stress relievers. Shooters can be a good choice for that because they can be fast and visceral, but violence is not a necessary element to a good stress-relieving game. Proteus is a legendarily relaxing game, and not a hint of violence can be found there.

And no, violent games do not make people aggressive. That’s something the Fox News Moral Crusaders have been trying to imply for years, but there’s simply nothing to back it up. In study after study, it’s coming out that while sometimes playing games can cause indicia of aggression in players it is the competition, not the violence, which causes it. That is, people playing Mario Kart against others are much more likely to get “aggressive” than people playing Manhunt on their own, which means depictions of violence have little or nothing to do with it.

indiestatik:

Bahraini Developers Prepare For First Bahrain-Based Game Jam In June

indiestatik:

Bahraini Developers Prepare For First Bahrain-Based Game Jam In June

videogamenostalgia:

 Red Orchestra 2 is free on Steam for today! If you download it today you get to keep it permanently!

videogamenostalgia:

Red Orchestra 2 is free on Steam for today! If you download it today you get to keep it permanently!

caramelzappa:

I love some of the ideas of Starbound but I have no patience for the grindy nature of “crafting” games. Exploring endless, randomly generated planets with deep catacombs? That sounds amazing! Spending hours whittling down at trees and mining ore? Far less interesting.

So what PSP or PSOne classic games do you guys recommend?

100rings:

caramelzappa:

(Keeping in mind I’ve missed nearly all of them.)

Definitely recommend Persona 2: Innocent Sin and Persona 3 Portable. I find JRPGs easier to play on a handheld as you can put it on sleep and chip away at them over time, they both tell some of my favourite game stories. I really liked MGS: Peace Walker, for all it’s basically an adaptation of Dr. Strangelove but with big robots. It goes back to a kind of simpler form of MGS gameplay with a lot less cutscene madness than the series is infamous for. If you want a weird platformer there’s LocoRoco 2, which is colourful to the point of being obnoxious. Both PSP God of War games do more with the narrative with than any of the console ones and provide some solid hack n’ slash. I also really love Resistance: Retribution, as it’s a shooter that made the PSP controls actually function and has some really cool moments, without any attachment to the series it may not leave as much of an impression though. 

A lot of people also rate the Patapon games, but they personally never did anything for me. 

I agree with so much of this (though I haven’t gotten a chance to play any of the Persona games yet.) I would also add Jeanne d’Arc to the list. It’s a nice SRPG for those of us who don’t really like SRPGs.

Idea for a game

100rings:

Open world Spider-Man game where you actually have to manage time effectively as both Peter Parker and Spider-Man. Miss too many classes, get fired from too many jobs - Peter’s life suffers. Let crime and villains grow out of control - Peter’s life suffers.
Effective communication of a key part of the superhero narrative through gameplay.

Oh man, that sounds brilliant from a narrative/”real superhero experience” kinda perspective, but I absolutely hate restrictive time management in games. If you give me a huge world to play around in and then punish me for playing around in it, I will not be a happy boy. I’m looking at you, Majora’s Mask.

cdrlizziebean:

if you love me buy me video games.

Agreed. Might I recommend everyone showing their love using my handy-dandy Steam wishlist. It’s conveniently sorted by price, so you can choose exactly how many dollars worth of love you feel for me. I would also accept love in the form of a PS3 or PS Vita. 3DS- or WiiU-shaped love would also not be rejected.

Freeware Recommendations - 4/22/14

Often, I find free games that are good, but for whatever reason do not warrant a full review. They may be too short or too prone to spoilers to review separately, but are still interesting and worth a playthrough. Today’s picks are all playable in your browser, though some can be downloaded as well, if you prefer. Enjoy!

image

Olav & the Lute (Win/browser) - This is a music-driven adventure game that reminded me a little of Shrug Song. This is ultimately a more full and complete experience, though. The story is very unclear, but you play as someone (Olav, I guess?) who is thrust into a different world and needs to activate a loom for reasons unknown. To do so, you’ll need to perform a number of different actions with your (apparently magical) lute. As you walk around the environment and poke around, you’ll learn new songs that cause various effects to whichever object you currently have selected. In classic adventure game style, you’ll need to affect different objects in combination to solve environmental puzzles. The cool thing is that each song can be played forwards or backwards, and doing so causes reverse effects. One song can either “destroy” or “repair,” another can either “fill” or “empty” and so on. By the end, you’ll have a lot of options you can try out on the people and objects in the game, and figuring out the various puzzles is simple but satisfying. This will take you maybe 20-30 minutes, and I definitely think it’s worth the time.

image

I am a brave knight (browser/Win/Mac/Linux) - Made in 48 hours for the Global Game Jam in Costa Rica, this is a short story that retells all the major defining moments of a man’s life, from childhood to death. In that way, it reminded me a bit of Passage. Here, though, the interaction takes place entirely with timed word inputs, making the gameplay a sort of cross between QTEs and a typing tutor. That may not be the most exciting way to describe a game, but I actually enjoyed my very short time with it. The tale it tells is not very original (marriage, kids, etc.), but the combination of the nice brush-stroke artwork and pretty but somber music manage to overcome that and still make an emotional impact, despite being fairly predictable. With a play time of less than two minutes, you’ve got nothing to lose by checking this one out.

image

Electric Tortoise (browser) - Inspired by Blade Runner and Isaac Asimov’s robot fiction, this is basically a text adventure that takes the form of a first-person interrogation. You play a detective questioning a robot who is accused of murdering its master. The resulting conversation is short, but actually pretty cool. There’s some good writing, and it manages to be a decent little look into the Asimov Robot mythos (but you don’t need to know the source material to enjoy the story). This will probably not be something you’ll remember long after playing it, but it does what it does pretty well. It provides a good story and offers you a few interesting choices as to how you want to affect it. Again, for a couple of minutes and zero dollars, there’s no reason not to give it a spin.

valvesoftware:

going to college like

image